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NEWS

Registration Open for Fall Continuing Education Workshop

Check out the workshops coming up in September, October and Convention in November. Register online, over the phone, or via mail.

MPA's Committment to Justice and Advocacy

The Maryland Psychological Association Board of Directors acknowledges the many colleagues who have been and/or have encountered clients, students, or colleagues who have been profoundly affected by the divisive events of the last several months in this country. The APA Code of Ethics states that we should work to, "minimize harm wherever it is unforeseeable and unavoidable". As psychologists, we not only advocate for the use of psychological science for the creation of policies that promote public good - particularly for those who, due to their identities, are disenfranchised and marginalized - but we do not stand idly by while science is misused or ignored to further marginalize disenfranchised groups.

It is in this vein that MPA and the MPA Board recommit to our value of increasing knowledge, professional competence, and appreciation of all people, those of all races, ethnicities, genders, ages, education levels, languages, religions, nationalities, sexual orientations, levels of physical ability, and socio-economic statuses. We remain steadfast in our mission to advance psychology as a means of "...promoting human welfare," and are bound by professional ethics of integrity and justice.

We are here to support you, our members, in your efforts to engage and address the stressors that have arisen. Coming together as a community and using our skills as clinicians and scholars to work towards engaging in constructive and respectful dialogue is essential at this time. In whatever way that you are participating in this mission, we thank you and we ask that you stay engaged with MPA in helping you further these values. Please let us know if there is anything that you need, and how we may best reaffirm our commitments to you and our community.

Resources for coping with traumatic events in the news

It is typical for people to experience a variety of emotions following such a traumatic event. These feelings can include shock, sorrow, numbness, fear, anger, disillusionment, grief and others. You may find that you have trouble sleeping, concentrating, eating or remembering even simple tasks. This is common and should pass after a while. Over time, the caring support of family and friends can help to lessen the emotional impact and ultimately make the changes brought about by the tragedy more manageable. You may feel that the world is a more dangerous place today than you did yesterday. It will take some time to recover your sense of equilibrium. APA offers some tips on how to strengthen your resilience after a shooting and indirect exposure to terror. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network also offers resources for parents and educators on talking to kids about news.


Upcoming Continuing Education

See our full list of upcoming workshops and join MPA or subscribe for our monthly CE Updates - We'll let you know when registration opens and new workshops are available!